Кэрролл Джон Дейли

Carroll John Daly
 (14 September 1889 16 January 1958)
  Yonkers (New York) – Los Angeles (California)
 

Bibliography

Last modified: 29.09.2012
===================

Series characters:
Chester Robinson
[a kid]
4 stories:
Not Reel Life (3 March 1923)
All for Love (17 March 1923)
The Heart of a Cake Eater (21 April 1923)
A Question of Ethics (22 December 1923)

Terry Mack [Three Gun Terry] [Private Investigator; The very first hardboiled private eye in h-b fiction] 2 stories & 1 novel:
Three Gun Terry (15 May 1923)
Action! Action! (1 January 1924)

novel:
The Man in the Shadows
(1928)

Race Williams [two-fisted Private Detective from New York] ~62* stories & 10 novels:
Knights of the Open Palm (1 June 1923)
Three Thousand to the Good (15 July 1923)
The Red Peril (June 1924)
Them That Lives by Their Guns (August 1924)
Devil Cat (November 1924)
The Face Behind the Mask (February 1925)
Conceited, Maybe (April 1925)
Say It with Lead (June 1925)
I'll Tell the World (August 1925)
Alias, Buttercup (October 1925)
novel: Under Cover [parts:1-2] (December 1925 - January 1926)
South Sea Steel (May 1926)
The False Clara Burkhart (July 1926)
The Super Devil (August 1926)
Half-Breed (November 1926)
Blind Alleys (April 1927)
*novel: The Snarl of the Beast [parts: 1-4] (June, July, August, September 1927) [*
book - 1927]
The Egyptian Lure (March 1928)
*novel: The Hidden Hand [Creeping Death] (June 1928); The Hidden Hand - Wanted For Murder (July 1928); The Hidden Hand - Rough Stuff (August 1928); The Hidden Hand - The Last Chance (September 1928); The Hidden Hand - The Last Shot (October 1928). [*
book - 1929]
*
novel: Tags of Death (March 1929); A Pretty Bit of Shooting (April 1929); Get Race Williams (May 1929); Race Williams Never Bluffs (June 1929) [aka: The Tag Murders *
book - 1930] Race Williams (& Flame)
novel: The Silver Eagle (October- November 1929); [*? title of 2nd part: "The Death Trap" (November 1929). Serial dropped after Part 2]
Race Williams (& Flame)
*novel: Tainted Power (June 1930); Framed (July 1930); The Final Shot (August 1930) [aka: Tainted Power *
book - 1931] Race Williams (& Flame)
Shooting Out of Turn (October 1930)
Murder by Mail (March 1931)
*novel: The Flame and Race Williams [parts:1-3] (June, July, August 1931) [aka: The Third Murderer *
book - 1931] Race Williams (& Flame)
Death for Two (September 1931)
*novel: The Amateur Murderer [parts:1-4] (April, May, June, July 1932) [*
book - 1933]
Merger with Death (December 1932)
The Death Drop (May 1933)
If Death Is Respectable (July 1933)
Murder in the Open (October 1933)
*novel: Six Have Died (May 1934); Flaming Death (June 1934); Murder Book (August 1934) [aka: Murder from the East *
book - 1935] Race Williams (& Flame)
The Eyes Have It (November 1934)
Some Die Hard (September 1935)
Dead Hands Reaching (November 1935)
Corpse & Co. (February 1936)
Just Another Stiff (April 1936)
City of Blood (October 1936)
The Morgue's Our Home (December 1936)
Monogram in Lead (February 1937)
Dead Men Don't Kill (August 1937)
Anyone's Corpse! (October 1937)
The $1,000,000 Corpse (December 1937)
Race Williams-?* (+ see [different-?*]: March 1950)
The Book of the Dead (January 1938)
A Corpse on the House (March 1938)
A Corpse for a Corpse (July 1938)
The Men in Black (October 1938)
The Quick and the Dead (December 1938)
Hell with the Lid Lifted (March 1939)
A Corpse in the Hand (June 1939)
Gangman's Gallows (August 1939)
The White-Headed Corpse (November 1939)
Cash for a Killer (February 1940) [= London: Gollancz, 1950-?*]  Race Williams-?*
Victim for Vengeance (September 1940)
novel: Better Corpses (*
! book only -1940) Race Williams (& Flame)
Too Dead to Pay
(March 1941)
Body, Body
Who's Got the Body? (October 1944) Race Williams-?*
A Corpse Loses Its Head (March 1945) 
Race Williams-?*
Unremembered Murder
(March 1947)
This Corpse on Me (June 1947)
I'll Feel Better When You're Dead (December 1947)

Not My Corpse (June 1948)
Race Williams' Double Date (August 1948)
The Wrong Corpse (February 1949)
Half a Corpse (May 1949)
Race Williams Cooks a Goose (October 1949)
The $100,000 Corpse ( March 1950) (see [different-?*]: December 1937)

The Strange Case of Alta May (April 1950)
Little Miss Murder (June 1952)
Race Williams-?*
This Corpse Is Free! (September 1952)

Gas (June 1953, Smashing Detective)
Head over Homicide (May 1955) [wrong title (misspelling): Head over Heels]

Doc Fay [ ? ] 3 stories:
The Code of the House (October 1926)
The House of Crime (10 November 1928)
Silence (10 March 1933)

(Vivian) Vee Brown [The Crime Machine] [Manhattan DA's Investigator. Police detective, small and unathletic, but deadly with a gun; "The greatest of song writers Master of Melody and Detective Killer of Men"] 14 stories & 2 novels:
magazine publications:
The Crime Machine (January 1932)
The Sixth Bullet (February 1932)
The Curtain of Frost (March 1932)
The Call to Kill (April 1932)
The Death Master (May 1932)
Murder at Midnight (August 1932)
As Midnight Strikes (October 1932)
The Red Death (November 1932)
The Price of Silence (15 March 1933)
*novel (1part): The Black Warning (1 September 1933) re-worked to the novel "The Emperor of Evil" [*book - 1936]
The Death Mask (1 November 1933)
*novel (2part): The Swinging Corpse (15 December 1933) re-worked to the novel "The Emperor of Evil" [*book - 1936]
*novel (3part): Make Your Own Corpse! (15 April 1934) re-worked to the novel "The Emperor of Evil" [*book - 1936]
Murder Syndicate (15 July 1934)
*novel (4part): Red Friday (1 September 1934) These stories were later re-worked to become the novel "The Emperor of Evil" [*book - 1936]
The Clawed Killer (15 October 1934)
The Mark of the Raven (January 1936)
Red Dynamite (July 1936)
books:
novel:
Murder Won't Wait
(1933)
*novel: Emperor of Evil (1936) [originally published serially in Dime Detective:
The Black Warning (1 September 1933); The Swinging Corpse (15 December 1933); Make Your Own Corpse! (15 April 1934); Red Friday (1 September 1934). These stories were later re-worked to become the novel "The Emperor of Evil".]

(Frank) 'Satan' Hall [ruthless Detective First Grade in the New York Police Department (he was known as: 'Hunter of Men' & 'Lone Wolf of the Department')] ~18 (23)* stories & ~3* novels:
magazine publications:
Satan
's Lash (8 August 1931)
Satan Sees Red (25 June 1932)
Satan's Law (6 August 1932)
Satan's Kill (19 November 1932)
Satan's Creed (17 December, 1932)
novel: Death's Juggler (UK, 1935 *
book), aka: The Mystery of the Smoking Gun. (US, 1936 *book) [This novel is made up of 5 connected novelettes originally published in Detective Fiction Weekly in 1933: 1. Death by Appointment (25 March 1933); 2. Satan's Mark (22 April 1933); 3. If It Is Murder (3 June 1933); 4. Satan Strikes (12 August 1933); 5. Satan's Threat (11 November 1933)] Satan Hall (& Johnny Zitto)
Satan Returns (8 September 1934) [*This story was later re-worked for the novel "Ready to Burn" (1951)]
Satan Laughed (15 December 1934) [*This story was later re-worked for the novel "Ready to Burn" (1951)]
Ready to Burn (16 February 1935, Detective Fiction Weekly)
[*This story was later re-worked for the novel "Ready to Burn" (1951)]
novel: Satan's Vengeance [parts:1-8] (7 March - 25 April 1936)

I Am the Law (March 1938, Black Mask) [*They are two different stories! see: November 1948.]
Wrong Street (May 1938)
Securities Exchanged For Death (August 1940)
The Hand of Satan (May 1941)

Mr. Sinister (April 1944) [long novelette] [*NB!!! Mr. Sinister (11 November-25 November 1939) Clay Holt / They are two different stories!]
I'll Be Killing You
(September 1945)
Name Your Stiff
(February 1946)
I Am the Law
(November 1948, Black Book Detective) [*They are two different stories! see: March 1938.]
Bury Me in the Same Grave
(March 1949)
Avenging Angel
(February 1954)
book:
novel:
Ready to Burn
(1951) [
The novel is comprised of "short novels" from Detective Fiction Weekly: 1. Satan Returns (8 September 1934); 2. Satan Laughed (15 December 1934); 3. Ready to Burn (16 February 1935, Detective Fiction Weekly).]

Marty Day [agent of "Reckoner"; (a rich man who lost all his money and was picked up by the mysterious "Reckoner")] 4* stories:
The Curtain of Steel
(February 1933)
Drawn in Blood (1 June 1933)
Blood on the Curtain (1 December 1933)
Answered in Blood (1 March 1934)

Twist Sullivan [a dick (*? detective*) in the silk mask because of his scarred face] ~2* stories:
The Killer in the Hood (14 April 1934) *?
Behind the Black Hood (23 June 1934)

Clay Holt [private detective] 7* stories & 1 novel:
Death Drops In
(1 July 1934)
Ticket to Murder (1 October 1934)
Excuse to Kill (15 December 1934)
The Bridal Bullet (1 May 1935)
Murder Made Easy (May 1939)
novel: Mr. Sinister (11 November-25 November 1939) [*NB!!!  
Mr. Sinister (April 1944, Flynn's Detective Fiction) Satan Hall / They are two different stories!]
Clay Holt, Detective (February 1942)
The Corpse in the Picture (May 1953)

Freddy Farrington [a wealthy gentleman and a snappy dresser living in New York City. He is known as a man who never breaks his word] ~2* stories:
Murder Theme (July 1944)
The Cops Came at Seven (August 1953)

Mr. Strang  [crime-fighting amateur detective ("In his skull is embedded a bullet. Through the underworld glide his lieutenants, men and girls willing to be tortured to death to aid him. He cares nothing for power, nothing for safety."] ~3* stories & 2 novels:
stories:
Parole
(6 April 1935)
Lady of Death (1 June 1935)
Behind the Curtain
(10 August 1935)
novel:
Mr. Strang (1936) [The novel was made up of of the three long novelettes: "Parole", "The Lady of Death" and "Behind the Curtain". Hardly a word was changed.]
novel: The Legion of the Living Dead (story-serial in 4 parts: May 1937) [*book - 1947]

Pete Hines [bodyguard] 2 stories:
No Sap for Murder (November 1940)
Five Minutes for Murder (January 1941)

Short Stories,
Linked Stories & Novelettes:

Slivers Finds a Champeen (February 1922, Wayside Tales)
Sticker Wilson (10 March 1922, People's Story Magazine)
Dolly (October 1922, Black Mask [New York])

[--1st-person narrated mood piece (p. 57-65); with editorial comment on story (p.65)]

The False Burton Combs (December 1922, Black Mask)
(Reprinted in The Hard-Boiled Detective: Stories from Black Mask Magazine (1920-1951), edited by Herbert Ruhm [NY: Vintage, 1977]);
(also in Oxford Book of American Detective Stories, ed. Tony Hillerman & Rosemary Herbert [Oxford, 1996])

[--1st-person narrated in vernacular. The main character - an unnamed "gentleman adventurer/soldier of fortune"]

Roarin' Jack (December 1922, Black Mask) as John D. Carroll
A Gift of the Gods (1 January 1923, People's Story Magazine)
Not Reel Life (3 March 1923, Argosy All-Story Weekly) Chester Robinson
All for Love  (17 March 1923, Argosy All-Story Weekly) Chester Robinson
It's All in the Game (15 April 1923, Black Mask)

[--1st-person narrator, preying on "leading lights of the underworld", e.g., Ed, The Killer]

The Heart of a Cake Eater  (21 April 1923, Argosy All-Story Weekly) Chester Robinson
Paying an Old Debt: A Burglar's Story. (April 1923, The American Magazine)
Three Gun Terry (15 May 1923, Black Mask) Terry Mack-1
(Reprinted in The Black Mask Boys: Masters in the Hard-Boiled School of Detective Fiction, edited by William F. Nolan [NY: The Mysterious Press, 1985])

Knights of the Open Palm (1 June 1923, Black Mask) Race Williams-1
(Reprinted in The Great American Detective: 15 Stories Starring America's Most Celebrated Private Detectives, edited by William Kittredge & Steven M. Krauzer [NY: New American Library [Mentor-?*], 1978])

[--Debut of Race Williams. KKK story in special KKK issue of Black Mask, with a letter from Daly on story (page 127)]

The Lexicon of Youth (16 June 1923, Argosy All-Story Weekly)
Three Thousand to the Good (15 July 1923, Black Mask) Race Williams
Kiss-the-Canvas Crowley (1 September 1923, Black Mask)

[--Prize-fight story]

Not All in Books (27 October 1923, Argosy All-Story Weekly)

[*the main character - a lawyer]

That Crude Idea (15 December 1923, Top-Notch)
A Question of Ethics (22 December 1923, Argosy All-Story Weekly) Chester Robinson
Action! Action! (1 January 1924, Black Mask) Terry Mack
The Brute (15 January 1924, Black Mask)

[*the main character - Buck Henderson. set: South Seas]

Creatures of the Night (February 1924, Action Stories)
Marty from Arizona (29 March 1924, Argosy All-Story Weekly)
Golf is Golf (8 April 1924, Sport Story Magazine)
One Night of Frenzy (15 April 1924, Black Mask)
Fingers of Mohammed (Jun 1924 Action Stories)
The Red Peril (June 1924, Black Mask) Race Williams
Them That Lives by Their Guns (August 1924, Black Mask) Race Williams
Devil Cat (November 1924, Black Mask) Race Williams
The Gentleman from Hell (31 January 1925, Argosy All-Story Weekly)

[*the main character -Tracey Young, a 1st person P.I., talks just like Race Williams]

The Face Behind the Mask (February 1925, Black Mask) Race Williams
Conceited, Maybe (April 1925, Black Mask) Race Williams
A Sentiment Job (11 April 1925, Argosy All-Story Weekly)

[*the main character - Larry Donnigan, a tough ex-con]

Say It with Lead! (June 1925, Black Mask) Race Williams
I'll Tell the World (August 1925, Black Mask) Race Williams
While the Bowery Sleeps (25 August 1925, Complete Story Magazine)
No Man's Island (September 1925, Action Stories)
Alias, Buttercup (October 1925, Black Mask) Race Williams

[--Race Williams in Mexico]

The Game Guy (8 October 1925, Sport Story Magazine) [football story]

[--Tod wanted more than anything to be a game guy. And he was one, although nobody realized it. But there came a time when a game guy was needed and when not any sort of a guy was available except Tod. Well, that was a time when several thousand people saw a real crisis in football.]

The Honor of the Force (November 1925, Triple-X [ed. Roscoe Fawcett])
Under Cover [parts:1-2] (December 1925 -  January 1926, Black Mask) Race Williams
Lurking Shadows (May 1926, Triple-X [ed. Roscoe Fawcett])

[--A vivid tale of Chinamen, opium traffic, Secret Service, and desperate FIGHTING! A Complete Chinatown Mystery Novelette by the Author of 'Honor of the Force']

South Sea Steel (May 1926, Black Mask) Race Williams

[--Race Williams in South Seas]

The False Clara Burkhart (July 1926, Black Mask) Race Williams
The Super Devil (August 1926, Black Mask) Race Williams
The Code of the House (October 1926, Detective Story [New York]) Doc Fay
Out of the Night (October 1926, Black Mask)
Half-Breed (November 1926, Black Mask) Race Williams

[--Race Williams among the Oklahoma oil-rich Osage Indians]

Twenty Grand (January 1927, Black Mask)

[*the main character - Benny Slawson, "product of Delancey Street"]

Blind Alleys (April 1927, Black Mask) Race Williams
The Snarl of the Beast [parts: 1-4] (June, July, August, September 1927, Black Mask) Race Williams

[*republished as a novel (NY: Clode, 1927; London: Hutchinson, 1928)]

The Last of the Dunlaps (18 February 1928, Detective Fiction Weekly [New York])
The Egyptian Lure (March 1928, Black Mask) Race Williams
(reprinted in Pulp Friction, ed. Peter Haining [London: Souvenir Press, 1996])

[--" The name of Race Williams stands for service"]

The Law of Silence (April 1928, Black Mask) part 1,
The Law of Silence
- The Show-Down (May 1928, Black Mask) part 2

[--Crime story in 2 parts, with 1st person narrator, Charlie]

The Hidden Hand - Creeping Death (June 1928, Black Mask) part 1, Race Williams
The Hidden Hand - Wanted For Murder (July 1928, Black Mask) part 2,
Race Williams
The Hidden Hand - Rough Stuff (August 1928, Black Mask) part 3,
Race Williams
The Hidden Hand - The Last Chance (September 1928, Black Mask) part 4,
Race Williams
The Hidden Hand - The Last Shot (October 1928, Black Mask) part 5.
Race Williams

[*These five stories are a "loosely organized serial".] [+ word-sketch of Race Williams in October issue, p.124]
[*
republished as the novel - The Hidden Hand (NY: Clode, 1929; London: Hutchinson, 1930)   Race Williams ]
[--Race Williams vs. The Hidden Hand (Howard Travers).]

The Bad Man (15 October 1928, Complete Stories)
The House of Crime (10 November 1928, Detective Fiction Weekly [New York]) Doc Fay
Border Law (15 November 1928, Complete Stories)
Gun Law (February 1929, Complete Stories [New York])
The Killer Instinct (March 1929, Fight Stories)
Tags of Death (March 1929, Black Mask) part 1, Race Williams (& Flame)
A Pretty Bit of Shooting
(April 1929, Black Mask) part 2,
Race Williams (& Flame -?*)
Get Race Williams
(May 1929, Black Mask) part 3,
Race Williams (& Flame)
Race Williams Never Bluffs
(June 1929, Black Mask) part 4,
Race Williams (& Flame -?*)

[*These four stories are a "loosely organized serial"]
[
aka: *
republished as the novel - The Tag Murders (NY: Clode, 1930; London: Hutchinson, 1931) Race Williams (& Flame)]
[--Introducing The Flame (Florence Drummond) - the Girl with the Criminal Mind]

The Amateur Gunman (15 June 1929, Complete Stories)
The Silver Eagle (October- November 1929, Black Mask) Race Williams (& Flame)

[*? in 2 parts:
"The Silver Eagle" (October 1929, Black Mask) 
Race Williams
"The Death Trap" (November 1929, Black Mask)  
Race Williams]

[*serial dropped after Part 2.]

The Last Shot (15 November 1929, Complete Stories)

[???* NB: part 5. The Hidden Hand - The Last Shot (October 1928, Black Mask) Race Williams]

Tainted Power (June 1930, Black Mask) part1; Race Williams (& Flame)
Framed
(July 1930, Black Mask) part2;
Race Williams (& Flame)
The Final Shot
(August 1930, Black Mask) part3.
Race Williams (& Flame)

[*These three stories are a "loosely organized serial"]
[*
republished as the novel - Tainted Power (NY: Clode, 1931; London: Hutchinson, 1931) Race Williams (& Flame)]

Shooting Out of Turn (October 1930, Black Mask) Race Williams

[--Race Williams goes out of town on a gun job]

Murder by Mail (March 1931, Black Mask) Race Williams

[--Race Williams vs. Bull Lowery]

The Flame and Race Williams [parts:1-3] (June, July, August 1931, Black Mask) Race Williams (& Flame)

[aka: *republished as the novel - The Third Murderer (NY: Farrar and Rinehart, 1931; London: Hutchinson, 1932) Race Williams (& Flame)]

Satan's Lash (8 August 1931, Street & Smith's Detective Story Magazine) Satan Hall
Death for Two (September 1931, Black Mask) Race Williams

[--Race Williams pinch-hits for his friend, Sergeant O'Rourke]

The Crime Machine (January 1932, Dime Detective [New York]) Vee Brown
(reprinted in Hard-Boiled Detectives: 23 Great Stories from Dime Detective Magazine, ed. Stefan R. Dziemianowicz, Robert Weinberg & Martin H. Greenberg [Gramercy Books, 1992])
The Sixth Bullet (February 1932, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
The Curtain of Frost (March 1932, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
The Call to Kill (April 1932, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
The Death Master (May 1932, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
Mock Duck (May 1932, Black Aces)
Satan Sees Red (25 June 1932, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall 
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Satan Hall: A Dime Detective Book" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1988])
The Amateur Murderer [parts:1-4] (April, May, June, July 1932, Black Mask)  Race Williams

[+ a Daly's anecdote, page 119 in April issue]
[*
republished as a novel (NY: I. Washburn, 1933; London: Hutchinson, 1933)]

Satan's Law (6 August 1932, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall 
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Satan Hall: A Dime Detective Book" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1988])
Murder at Midnight (August 1932, Dime Detective; also - Detective Tales [UK], Apr' 1962) Vee Brown
As Midnight Strikes (October 1932, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
The Red Death (November 1932, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
Satan's Kill (19 November 1932, Detective Fiction Weekly)  Satan Hall
Merger with Death (December 1932, Black Mask) Race Williams
Satan's Creed (17 December 1932, Detective Fiction Weekly)  Satan Hall
The Curtain of Steel (February 1933, Dime Detective) Marty Day
Silence (10 March 1933, Detective Story) Doc Fay
The Price of Silence (15 March 1933, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
Death by Appointment (25 March 1933, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall (& Johnny Zitto-1/5)

[*republished as 1st part of the novel Death's Juggler (UK, 1935 *book), aka: The Mystery of the Smoking Gun. (US, 1936 *book)

Satan's Mark (22 April 1933, Detective Fiction Weekly; also in - Strange Detective Mysteries [Canada] Sep' 1945) Satan Hall (& Johnny Zitto-2/5)

[*republished as 2nd part of the novel Death's Juggler (UK, 1935 *book), aka: The Mystery of the Smoking Gun. (US, 1936 *book)

The Death Drop (May 1933, Black Mask) Race Williams

[--Race Williams out in the countryside]

Drawn in Blood (1 June 1933, Dime Detective) Marty Day
If It Is Murder (3 June 1933, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall (& Johnny Zitto-3/5)

[*republished as 3rd part of the novel Death's Juggler (UK, 1935 *book), aka: The Mystery of the Smoking Gun. (US, 1936 *book)

If Death Is Respectable (July 1933, Black Mask) Race Williams
Satan Strikes (12 August 1933, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall (& Johnny Zitto-4/5)

[*republished as 4th part of the novel Death's Juggler (UK, 1935 *book), aka: The Mystery of the Smoking Gun. (US, 1936 *book)

The Black Warning (1 September 1933, Dime Detective) Vee Brown

[--Over the whole city hung a ghastly murder pall - the dread shadow of The Black Death. And only Detective Vee Brown - The Crime Machine--new its source. Knew that the killer was whetting his blade to carve at a blood feast.
--Description from Vintage Library: This version was the first part in a series of Vee Brown stories for Dime Detective. These stories were later re-worked to become the novel "The Emperor of Evil".]

The Sign of the Rat (2 September 1933, Detective Fiction Weekly)
The Man from San Quentin [parts:1-4] (February, March, [?], & October 1933, Clues)
Murder in the Open (October 1933, Black Mask) Race Williams
The Death Mask (1 November 1933, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
Satan's Threat (11 November 1933, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall (& Johnny Zitto-5/5)

[*republished as 5th part of the novel Death's Juggler (UK, 1935 *book), aka: The Mystery of the Smoking Gun. (US, 1936 *book)

Blood on the Curtain (1 December 1933, Dime Detective) Marty Day
The Swinging Corpse (15 December 1933, Dime Detective) Vee Brown

[--There it hung at the cross roads of the world-Fifth Avenue and Forty-second Street - a ghastly, mutilated corpse. And on its chest was pinned The Black Death's final warning. How had it got there through the midnight fog? Why had the Cat Man swung it from a lamp post on the best known corner in all New York?
--Description from Vintage Library: This version was the second part in a series of Vee Brown stories for Dime Detective. These stories were later re-worked to become the novel "The Emperor of Evil".]

Answered in Blood (1 March 1934, Dime Detective) Marty Day
The Killer in the Hood (14 April 1934, Detective Fiction Weekly) Twist Sullivan *?
Make Your Own Corpse! (15 April 1934, Dime Detective) Vee Brown

[--The Murder Syndicate - that was how the death notes were signed. And only Detective Vee Brown - Crime Machine - Killer of Men, knew the ghastly menace that lay back of them - knew that crimeland's newest post-Repeal venture could be met with his own bullets and his alone.
--Description from Vintage Library: This version was the third part in a series of Vee Brown stories for Dime Detective. These stories were later re-worked to become the novel "The Emperor of Evil".]

The Shadow of Holy Joe (15 June 1934, Dime Detective)
Behind the Black Hood (23 June 1934, Detective Fiction Weekly) Twist Sullivan
Death Drops In (1 July 1934, Dime Detective) Clay Holt
One More Thrill (July, 1934, 10-Story Book magazine [vol. 33, No. 1])
The Mexican Legion (July 1934, Frontier Stories [New York])
Murder Syndicate (15 July 1934, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
Six Have Died (May 1934, Black Mask) part1; Race Williams (& Flame)
Flaming Death (June 1934, Black Mask) part2; Race Williams (& Flame)
Murder Book
(August 1934, Black Mask) part3;
Race Williams (& Flame)

[*These three stories are a "loosely organized serial"]
[aka: *
republished as the novel - Murder from the East (NY: Frederick A. Stokes, 1935; London: Hutchinson, 1935) Race Williams (& Flame)]

[NB! There is a different story (NOT about Race Williams) - Murder By The Book (September 1954, Smashing Detective Stories) with the main character - Baldwin Scott, P.I.]

Red Friday (1 September 1934, Dime Detective) Vee Brown

[--Friday the 13th - that was the night on the Murder Syndicate's crime calendar which had been picked for the final blood coup--a coup that was due to net millions for the death master. And that was the night Detective Brown went berserk - for Gertrude la Palatin was scheduled to "go up on the wall," a living picture of the Syndicate's red revenge on the Crime Machine.
--Description from Vintage Library: This version was the fourth and final part in a series of Vee Brown stories for Dime Detective. These stories were later re-worked to become the novel "The Emperor of Evil".]

Satan Returns (8 September 1934, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Satan Hall: A Dime Detective Book" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1988])

[*This story was later re-worked for the novel "Ready to Burn" (London: Museum Press, 1951; no American edition) Satan Hall

Ticket to Murder (1 October 1934, Dime Detective) Clay Holt
The Clawed Killer (15 October 1934, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
The Eyes Have It (November 1934, Black Mask) Race Williams
Excuse to Kill (15 December 1934, Dime Detective) Clay Holt
Satan Laughed (15 December 1934, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Satan Hall: A Dime Detective Book" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1988])

[*This story was later re-worked for the novel "Ready to Burn" (London: Museum Press, 1951; no American edition) Satan Hall

Ready to Burn (16 February 1935, Detective Fiction Weekly) Satan Hall

[*This story was later re-worked for the novel "Ready to Burn" (London: Museum Press, 1951; no American edition) Satan Hall
--Daly combined several of his Detective Fiction Weekly stories to make up the novel "Ready To Burn", including the title story.]

Parole (6 April 1935, Detective Fiction Weekly) Mr. Strang-1

[*This long novelette was later re-worked (with 2 others) to become the novel "Mr. Strang" (1936). Hardly a word was changed.]

The Bridal Bullet (1 May 1935, Dime Detective) Clay Holt
Lady of Death (1 June 1935, Detective Fiction Weekly) Mr. Strang-2

[*This long novelette was later re-worked (with 2 others) to become the novel "Mr. Strang" (1936). Hardly a word was changed.]

Behind the Curtain (10 August 1935, Detective Fiction Weekly) Mr. Strang-3

[*This long novelette was later re-worked (with 2 others) to become the novel "Mr. Strang" (1936). Hardly a word was changed.]

Some Die Hard (September 1935, Dime Detective) Race Williams
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Race Williams" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1989])
Dead Hands Reaching (November 1935, Dime Detective) Race Williams
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Race Williams" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1989])
The Mark of the Raven (January 1936, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
Corpse & Co. (February 1936, Dime Detective) Race Williams
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Race Williams" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1989])
aka: (Corpse & Company)
Satan's Vengeance [parts:1-8] (7 March - 25 April 1936, Detective Fiction Weekly)  Satan Hall
Just Another Stiff (April 1936, Dime Detective) Race Williams
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Race Williams" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1989])
(also in A Century of Noir, ed. Mickey Spillane & Max Allan Collins [New American Library 2002])
Red Dynamite (July 1936, Dime Detective) Vee Brown
City of Blood (October 1936, Dime Detective) Race Williams
(reprinted in "The Adventures of Race Williams" [NY: Mysterious Press, 1989])
The Tongueless Men. chapter 3: The Broken Bank. (November 1936, Dime Detective) with William E. Barrett and others.
[*Contest story.
"The Tungueless Men". Dime Detective magazine, the November issue of 1936:
John Lawrence. Chapter 1. "The Blonde with the Purple Tongue"
T. T. Flynn. Chapter 2. "The Vanishing Prelate"
Carroll John Daly. Chapter 3. "The Broken Bank"
Frederick C. Davis. Chapter 4. "The Lost Stairway"
William. E. Barrett. Chapter 5. "Only Two Swords".
--
The story appeared in a special "5th Anniversary Issue" of Dime Detective. Readers were given the names of the authors in alphabetical order and invited to guess which guy wrote each chapter. The authors were revealed on a different page in the back of the magazine.]
The Morgue's Our Home (December 1936, Dime Detective) Race Williams
The Man without a Face (January 1937, Clues)
Monogram in Lead (February 1937, Dime Detective) Race Williams
The Girl in the Yellow Mask (May 1937, Clues)
The Legion of the Living Dead [parts:1-4] (4part: 15 May 1937 Detective Fiction Weekly) Mr. Strang

[*republished as a novel (Toronto: Popular Publications [Canada], 1947)]

Where Killers Meet (May 1937, Top-Notch)
Dead Men Don't Kill (August 1937, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Anyone's Corpse! (October 1937, Dime Detective) Race Williams
The $1,000,000 Corpse (December 1937, Dime Detective) Race Williams-?*

[*NB!!!  They are two different stories! -??*
see: The $100,000 Corpse (March 1950, Popular Detective [New York])  Race Williams ]

The Book of the Dead (January 1938, Dime Detective) Race Williams
A Corpse on the House (March 1938, Dime Detective ) Race Williams
I Am the Law (March 1938, Black Mask) Satan Hall

[*NB!!! different story than I Am the Law (November 1948, Black Book Detective) Satan Hall ]

[--"Meet that implacable, coldly reckless manhunter, Satan Hall"]

Wrong Street (May 1938, Black Mask) Satan Hall
A Corpse for a Corpse (July 1938, Dime Detective) Race Williams
The Men in Black (October 1938, Dime Detective) Race Williams

[--Race Williams, a fast-shooting, fast-talking private investigator, is faced with the death-threat of a faster shooting crook named Orlin Tasker. Faster-shooting, or so they say... Race wants to get Tasker first, but his employers, the People Vs. Crime, want to use him as bait to Tasker's demands for a face-to-face meeting!]

The Quick and the Dead (December 1938, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Hell with the Lid Lifted (March 1939, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Murder Made Easy (May 1939, Black Mask) Clay Holt
A Corpse in the Hand (June 1939, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Gangman's Gallows (August 1939, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Mr. Sinister (11 November-25 November 1939, Detective Fiction Weekly) Clay Holt

[*NB!!!  They are two different stories! The early DFW version has Clay Holt as the main guy and the later story has Satan Hall.
see:
Mr. Sinister (April 1944, Flynn's Detective Fiction) Satan Hall ]

The White-Headed Corpse (November 1939, Dime Detective) Race Williams

[--Bert - which seemed to be all the name he had - was a walking corpse with hair that had turned white overnight. Quite a guy - Bert. He had more courage than most dead men and quite a few live ones - and when it came to leading me to Ira Lent - the invincible killer who ran the country's greatest spy-ring - he was right there with the goods. But me - I'm no slouch myself when I know who I'm shooting at. Hell, hadn't the G-men called me in to do their dirty work? Appointed me a sort of one-man Department of Justice when they couldn't cope with the great Ira on their own?]

Cash for a Killer (February 1940, Dime Detective) Race Williams

[?*=]  Cash for a Killer (in 'The Evening Standard Detective Book'. [London: Gollancz, 1950])  Race Williams-?*

Beauty and the Feast (25 May 1940, Argosy [New York])
Securities Exchanged For Death (August 1940, Detective Tales) Satan Hall
Victim for Vengeance (September 1940, Clues [New York]) Race Williams
Gun for Hire (25 October 1940, Short Stories; also - Short Stories [British reprint edition], November 1942)
Murder Plays Hooky (October 1940, Detective Tales)
No Sap for Murder (November 1940, Black Mask) Pete Hines-1

[--Pete Hines' motto: " It's better to be a live sap than a dead wise-guy' "]

The Strange Case of Iva Grey (December 1940, Dime Detective)

[*the main character - Connelly]

Five Minutes for Murder (January 1941, Black Mask) Pete Hines-2
Too Dead to Pay (March 1941, Clues; also in Detective Story Annual [Street & Smith Publications] v1, 1942) Race Williams
The Hand of Satan (May 1941, Detective Tales) Satan Hall
Clay Holt, Detective (February 1942, Street & Smith's Detective Story Magazine [New York];  also - Detective Story Magazine [UK] February 1942) Clay Holt
Johnny Was A Hero (March 1944, Argosy)
Little Murder Has Big Ears (April 1944, Detective Tales)
Mr. Sinister (April 1944, Flynn's Detective Fiction) [long novelette] Satan Hall
(reprinted in Tough Guys & Dangerous Dames, ed. Robert E. Weinberg, Stefan R. Dziemianowicz & Martin H. Greenberg [Barnes & Noble, 1993])

[chapters: 1. Death Gives an Order; 2. The Gunmaster; 3. "I Like to Make Trouble!"; 4. Satan Takes Over; 5. Scene Set for Murder.
*first line:
"If you have a little better food, a little better cooked and for a little better price, more people will wear a path to your door than any "better mouse trap" racket, despite the old adage."]

[*NB!!!  They are two different stories! The early DFW version has Clay Holt as the main guy and the later story has Satan Hall.
see: Mr. Sinister (11 November-25 November 1939, Detective Fiction Weekly) Clay Holt ]

City of the Dead (June 1944, Detective Fiction [New York])
Asking Price Murder (July 1944, New Detective Magazine)
Murder Theme (July 1944, Black Mask) Freddy Farrington

[--NOTE: Freddy is a wealthy gentleman and a snappy dresser living in New York City.  His adventures are narrated by his friend named Mack, formerly wealthy, who is now Freddy's private secretary and companion.  Freddy is known as a man who never breaks his word. "Murder Theme" is set in WWII because it's 1944 and Mack is then serving as a sergeant in the army.]

Body, Body Who's Got the Body? (October 1944, Street & Smith's Detective Story Magazine [NY]; also - Detective Story Magazine [UK] January 1945; also in Detective Story Annual 1946) Race Williams-?*
A Corpse Loses Its Head (March 1945, Street & Smith's Detective Story Magazine[NY];  also - Detective Story Magazine [UK] July 1945) Race Williams-?*
I'll Be Killing You (September 1945, New Detective [New York]) Satan Hall
The Seventh Murderer (November 1945, Detective Story)
Name Your Stiff (February 1946, New Detective) Satan Hall
You'll Remember Me (March 1946, Mammoth Detective)
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
The Giant Has Fleas (February 1947, Detective Story)

[--It was a detective's stubbornness that made big Joe Fenton, racketeer, and it was a detective's stubbornness that broke him.]

Unremembered Murder (March 1947, Street & Smith's Detective Story Magazine; also - Detective Story Magazine [UK] December 1947 ) Race Williams

[*first line: "I checked into the hotel, hesitated a moment over the register, and finally wrote my nameRace Williams."]

This Corpse on Me (June 1947, Thrilling Detective [New York]) Race Williams-?*
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
Dead Man's Street (September 1947, New Detective)
I'll Feel Better When You're Dead (December 1947, Thrilling Detective; also - Thrilling Detective [UK], Oct' 1948)  Race Williams-?*
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
Not My Corpse (June 1948, Thrilling Detective [British ed.-?*]) Race Williams
(reprinted in The Mammoth Book of Private Eye Stories, ed. by Bill Pronzini & Martin H. Greenberg [London: Robinson, 1988])

[*first line: "There may be likeable crooks and there may even be likeable killers, but Jake O'Hara was not one of them."
--blurb: Three debutantes are slain and a fourth is slated for death when a hard-hitting private sleuth comes along to challenge a grim killer whose cryptic messages spell doom!]
[! NB: NO RELATION to Unremembered Murder (March 1947, Detective Story)]
[--NOTE: "Not My Corpse" is a good story, with a very tangled publishing history. It was reprinted in Bill Pronzini and Martin Greenberg's "The Mammoth Book of Private Eye Stories" (1988), where I read it. It appeared under that title in the 1953 "Top Detective Annual", a yearly pulp collection. But internal evidence shows that the events of the story are taking place around 1946, shortly after the end of World War II in 1945. The Annuals were full of reprint material, suggesting that this is a retitled version of a story Daly first published c1947. A good candidate is "Unremembered Murder" (1947), a tale from the March 1947 Street & Smith's Detective Story Magazine. The title of "Unremembered Murder" fits the plot of the story. This Race Williams novella is a bit different in tone from some of his earlier works. It is more purely a detective story, with Williams solving a set of serial killings. Williams seems to be adapted a bit to the conventions of the Raymond Chandler private eye tale, then at the peak of its influence and popularity. There is no sign of the "pulp style of plotting" which Daly pioneered; instead, all the crimes turn out to be the work of a single villain, as in the classical detective tale. (Michael E. Grost. A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection)]

Race Williams' Double Date (August 1948, Dime Detective) Race Williams
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
The Law of the Night (September 1948, New Detective)
I Am the Law (November 1948, Black Book Detective) Satan Hall

[*NB!!! different story than the earlier one - I Am the Law (March 1938, Black Mask) Satan Hall ]

[--"Meet that implacable, coldly reckless manhunter, Satan Hall"]

The Wrong Corpse (February 1949, Thrilling Detective; also - Thrilling Detective [UK] Oct' 1949) Race Williams
Bury Me in the Same Grave (March 1949, Black Book Detective) Satan Hall
Half a Corpse (May 1949, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Race Williams Cooks a Goose (October 1949, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Outside of Time (January 1950, Weird Tales [v42, #2])
The $100,000 Corpse (March 1950, Popular Detective [New York])  Race Williams

[*first line: "There was something very likeable about Johnny Sharp."
--blurb: That hundred grand had already claimed one man, and offered death again, but Race Williams swore to deliver it to a girl
who didn't know it was hers!]

[*NB!!!  They are two different stories! -??*
see: The $1,000,000 Corpse
(December 1937, Dime Detective)
Race Williams-?* ]

The Strange Case of Alta May (April 1950, Thrilling Detective) Race Williams
If I Go in a Hearse (Spring 1950, Phantom Detective [New York])
A Bullet Marked Benny (October 1951, Dime Detective)

[*the main character - Cop "Old Benny"]

Murder in My Mind (Winter 1951, Giant Detective)

[--NOTE: the Mental Detective.
The narrator is the editor and publisher of the weekly newspaper the Sino Date Palm. The Mental Detective is a hypnotist named Malcolm Benedict.

*first line: "The little desert city of Sino lay broiling in the sun."
--blurb: Go with the Mental Detective on a trip into Betty Stanton's memory, where a killer hides, shrouded, unknown
and deadly!]

[wrong title - Murder in the Wind http://www.philsp.com/homeville/fmi/t749.htm#A16271 ]

Part of the Night (Winter 1951, Black Book Detective)
The Importance of Being Ernie (June 1952, Thrilling Detective)
Little Miss Murder (June 1952, Smashing Detective Stories [New York]) Race Williams-?*
This Corpse Is Free! (September 1952, Smashing Detective Stories; also - Smashing Detective Stories [UK] #5, 1952) Race Williams
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
Death Rehearsal (October 1952 Dime Detective; also - Detective Tales [UK] Apr' 1953)

[*the main character - Willie Bloto]

House by the River (February 1953, Famous Detective Stories)
The Corpse in the Picture (May 1953, Famous Detective Stories) Clay Holt
Gas (June 1953, Smashing Detective) Race Williams
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
The Cops Came at Seven (August 1953, Famous Detective Stories [New York]) Freddy Farrington
Lantern in the Mind (August 1953, Famous Detective) as John D. Carroll
Jackpot (Winter 1953, Thrilling Detective)
Avenging Angel (February 1954, Famous Detective Stories) Satan Hall
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
The Children's Gun (March 1954, Smashing Detective Stories) as John D. Carroll
Manhunter (August 1954, Famous Detective Stories)
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
Murder By The Book (September 1954, Smashing Detective Stories)

[*the main character - Baldwin Scott, P.I.]
[NB! This story is NOT about Race Williams (see: Murder Book [August 1934, Black Mask] part3 for
the novel - Murder from the East, 1935) Race Williams (& Flame)]

Murder Yet to Come (December 1954, Famous Detective Stories)
(reprinted in Race Williams' Double Date (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012)
With a Bullet in You (March 1955, Smashing Detective Stories)
Head over Homicide (May 1955, Smashing Detective Stories) Race Williams

[wrong title (misspelling) - Head over Heels]

Aunt Betsy's Arch Fiend (1956 #4, Double-Action Detective Stories) as John D. Carroll

Novels:

Two-Gun Gerta (New York: Chelsea House, 1926) written by C. C. Waddell & Carroll John Daly [western]

[serial segment publication (in 4 parts?): 1923 October 1, October 15, etc... in 'People's magazine']

[* Charles Carey Waddell (1868-1930), also published as Charles Carey]
[set: Mexico]
[
--Description from Vintage Library: Carroll John Daly brings his tough guy, hard boiled attitude to the Old West by teaming up with famed writer C.C. Waddell in Two Gun Gerta.
  When movie stuntman Red Conners heads south of the border for real life adventure, he meets up with Two-Gun Gerta who runs her own cattle ranch and is always running up against her ruthless competition. After Red agrees to work for Two-Gun Gerta, he begins to realize that she may have some dark secrets of her own that Red would rather not know about.]

The White Circle. (NY: Edward J. Clode, 1926; London: Hutchinson, 1927)

[set: NYC]

The Snarl of the Beast (NY: Clode, 1927; London: Hutchinson, 1928) Race Williams

[originally serialized in 4 parts: (June, July, August, September 1927, Black Mask)]

[--The first hard-boiled detective novel in hardcover form. A Race Williams mystery. "The story that introduced millions of mystery readers to Race Williams, a hard-boiled detective living in the gray areas between law and justice. Williams comes to the aid of a troubled young man who wants to protect his sister from being robbed of a large inheritance by their unscrupulous uncle."
--Book Description (from abebooks):  New York: Edward J. Clode, Inc, 1927. Inscribed To Joseph T. Shaw an editor and a friend Carroll John Daly. Carroll John Daly published the first hardboiled detective story in the pages of Black Mask (edited by Joseph Shaw) in 1923. Throughout the 1920s, his sleuth Race Williams was one of the magazine's most popular characters and Daly its most popular author. While his critical reputation has been eclipsed by Hammett, Daly's place in detective literature is assured. The Snarl of the Beast is his second book. An outstanding association linking two of the key names in American detective fiction.
--Description from Vintage Library: Race Williams is once again at his fighting best in this novel chock full of action. Behind the action unfolds a plot to get a large sum of inheritance money from the rightful owner. But who is the rightful owner? And why is everyone out to kill Race, who carries a secret document from his client? Among the Race Williams' pursuers is a man of gigantic proportions, a beast, some say, with the ability to deflect even bullets. Join Race in this battle to kill the beast, save the girl, and solve the case.
--"The police don't like me. The crooks don't like me. I'm just a halfway house between the law and crime; sort of working both ends against the middle. Right and wrong are not written on the statutes for me, nor do I find my code of morals in the essays of longwinded professors. My ethics are my own."]

The Man in the Shadows. (NY: Clode, 1928; London: Hutchinson, 1929) Terry Mack

[set: New England]
[--Book Description (from abebooks): Daly is considered THE pioneer writer of hard-boiled detective fiction. A complete recluse who was neurotic and agoraphobic, he was still one of the most popular detective writers of his time. His detective Terry Mack is significant as the first tough-talking private eye ever to appear in the pulp genre (debuting in May, 1923 in Black Mask). Mack reappears here with a plot that pingpongs from the present back to the Klondike gold rush, and ends in a series of dramatic episodes in the present (of course with his usual startling and unexpected conclusion).]

The Hidden Hand (NY: Clode, 1929; London: Hutchinson, 1930) Race Williams

[originally serialized in 1928 in Black Mask (in 5 parts): The Hidden Hand [Creeping Death] (June), Wanted For Murder (July), Rough Stuff (August), The Last Chance (September), The Last Shot (October). These five stories are a "loosely organized serial"]

[set: Florida]
[-- Book Description (from abebooks): New York: Edward Clode, 1929, 1929. First Edition. An exceptional association copy; inscribed by the author to the editor of Black Mask, "To Joe Shaw, A Regular Guy. Carroll John Daly." The author is generally considered the first important hard-boiled writer, and was a popular staple of Shaw's magazine.
--"Private investigator Race Williams is approached by a larger detective agency to help hunt down a criminal gang leader named James McCleary, but he turns down the deal because he prefers to work solo. Somehow word leaks out that he's on the case, and an assassin is put on his tail."
--"A ship bound for Miami on which a beautiful woman enters his life to complicate matters, and Private investigator Race Williams can't help hunt down a criminal gang leader named James McCleary."
--Daly's The Hidden Hand (1928) is at least as much a story sequence as a novel. It appeared as five short stories in Black Mask. Each tale is of novella length, around 50 pages. This is what Black Mask clearly considered as the ideal length for a short story. Each tale has a separate villain. The dividing lines between the stories is easily discerned in the book version. I do not have editions of the original Black Mask stories to compare, but my guess as to how chapters in the novel line up with the Black Mask stories: "The Hidden Hand": Chapters 1 - 8; "Wanted For Murder": Chapters 9 - 16; "Rough Stuff": Chapters 17 - 25; "The Last Chance": Chapters 26 - 34; "The Last Shot": Chapters 35 - 44; the dividing line between the last two stories is fuzzy, and 34/35 is just a guess. (Michael E. Grost. A Guide to Classic Mystery and Detection)]

The Tag Murders (NY: Clode, 1930; London: Hutchinson, 1931) Race Williams (& Flame)

[aka: originally published in Black Mask (in 4 parts): Tags of Death (March 1929), A Pretty Bit of Shooting (April 1929), Get Race Williams (May 1929), Race Williams Never Bluffs (June 1929). These four stories are a "loosely organized serial"]

[--Description from Vintage Library: Race Williams is at his best in this story about a ruthless criminal and his gang, whose signature is a metal tag, left on the body of their victim.
Race Williams fans will not be disappointed in this thriller...It features Daly's best characters, Gregory Ford, another detective which seems to bring out Race's competitive nature, and the Flame (Florence Drummond), the Girl with the Criminal mind. This is the first Flame story, and reveals a little more information about her background and interest in Race.]

Tainted Power (NY: Clode, 1931; London: Hutchinson, 1931) Race Williams (& Flame)

[originally published in Black Mask: Tainted Power (June 1930); Framed (July 1930); The Final Shot (August 1930). These three stories are a "loosely organized serial"]

[set: NYC]
[--Description from Vintage Library: 'Tainted Power' is vintage Daly, featuring Race Williams mixing with the Racketeering crowd, and "The Flame", the girl with the criminal mind.]

The Third Murderer (NY: Farrar and Rinehart, 1931; London: Hutchinson, 1932) Race Williams (& Flame)

[aka: originally published in Black Mask: The Flame and Race Williams [parts:1-3] (June, July, August 1931)]

[set: NYC]
[--Description from Vintage Library: 'The Devil is unchained!' This simple messages sends Race into his most complex and exciting case of his career. The Gorgon crime family is ruling the streets and courts of New York and Race's unknown client is orchestrating the showdown which will hopefully bring the Gorgons down. As the message unleashes a whirlwind of activity, the hidden, dark secrets of two families are uncovered. Follow Race through a complex, twisting and turning plot which will keep you and Race guessing at every turn. One of the best Daly stories we have found, we think it is one of the best action detective stories from the 1930's.
--Recommended Reading for Carroll John Daly (from Vintage Library): 
A great way to start is with 'Better Corpses' with Race Williams and the Flame. Its a great, action detective story which is also hilarious.
If you enjoy 'Better Corpses', and enjoyed the relationship between the Flame and Race, then we suggest the following three stories - 'The Tag Murders'; 'Tainted Power'; 'The Third Murderer' - where Race first meets the Flame and her story unfolds. This series concludes with the 'Third Murderer' which may be one of the most complicated plots in Pulp history.]

The Amateur Murderer (NY: Ives Washburn, 1933; London: Hutchinson, 1933) Race Williams

[originally serialized in 4 parts: (April, May, June, July 1932, Black Mask)]
[set: Baltimore, MD]

Murder Won't Wait (NY: Washburn, 1933; London: Hutchinson, 1934) Vee Brown

[set: NYC]
[
--Description from Vintage Library: Murder Won't Wait chronicles another adventure of Detective Vee Brown, a diminutive, yet dangerous upholder of the law. Along with his side-kick, Dean Condon, Brown tries to save a mysterious girl from the clutches of a dangerous underworld criminal]

Murder from the East (NY: Frederick A. Stokes, 1935; London: Hutchinson, 1935) Race Williams (& Flame)

[originally published in Black Mask: Six Have Died (May 1934); Flaming Death (June 1934); Murder Book (August 1934, Black Mask). These three stories are a "loosely organized serial"]

[set: NYC]
[--Description from Vintage Library: This is an out-and-out fast action thriller by an author whose previous yarns have raised the hair and chilled the spines of even the most blood thirsty mystery fans. Adventure - intrigue - hard sleek villains - beautiful women - and a hero who is really tough. Race Williams can shoot circles around any man you ever read about. If you want a story you don't have to think about - one that will take you by the scruff of the neck and pull you along without a break - this is it. Anyone who read paper back magazines when he was a kid and hid them, only to catch the old man reading them later - and who hasn't? - will be eternally grateful if you give him this.
--"The incomparably hard-boiled, bone-crushing, fast shooting Race Williams." (ERLE STANLEY GARDNER)]

Death's Juggler (London: Hutchinson, 1935) Satan Hall (& Johnny Zitto 1-5)
aka:
The Mystery of the Smoking Gun. (NY: Stokes, 1936)

[This novel is made up of 5 connected novelettes originally published in Detective Fiction Weekly in 1933: 1. Death by Appointment (25 March 1933); 2. Satan's Mark (22 April 1933); 3. If It Is Murder (3 June 1933); 4. Satan Strikes (12 August 1933); 5. Satan's Threat (11 November 1933)]

[set: NYC]
[-- "This is not really a mystery story. It is a tale of war to the death between an honest and fearless detective and the ruthless head of a great criminal organization... Regardless of how much or how little truth there be in the picture, it is one that stirs the blood and holds the attention as few crime stories do." (The New York Times, January 1936)
--Pulpmeister Daly, creator of the immortal Race Williams, acknowledged inventor of the hardboiled school of detection, in the book-length debut of another of his remarkable urban cowboy gumshoes, Satan Hall.]

Mr. Strang (NY: Stokes, 1936; London: Hale, 1937)  Mr. Strang

[--NOTE: The novel was made up of of the three long novelettes: Parole (6 April 1935), Lady of Death (1 June 1935), Behind the Curtain (10 August 1935). Hardly a word was changed.]

[--Mystery novel by an important Black Mask writer. "Mr. Strang is the punch packing story of a mysterious individual who sets out single handedly to break up the racket of Parole."
--Oddly engrossing tale from the hardboiled pioneer of an elegant vigilante with piercing eyes the color of "steel just before it cooled"--who targets paroled criminals. "You joke. I killed Faine, of course; but the death of such a man is hardly murder.]

Emperor of Evil (London: Hutchinson, 1936; NY: Stokes, 1937) Vee Brown

[originally published serially in Dime Detective: The Black Warning (1 September 1933); The Swinging Corpse (15 December 1933); Make Your Own Corpse! (15 April 1934); Red Friday (1 September 1934). These stories were later re-worked to become the novel "The Emperor of Evil".]

[set: NYC]
[
--Description from Vintage Library: Detective Vee Brown, although a diminutive body, drew and shot a gun faster than most any man alive. In this story, Brown, with the aid of his friend Dean Condon and the "girl of the night", attempt to bring a blackmailer to justice.
---To all appearances a respectable member of society and even possessed of an effeminate predilection for cats, Vincent van Houton never-the-less hid a mind of almost unrivalled evil and mental sadism behind a mask of suavity. Little Detective Vee Brown who, in spite of his apparent frailty, was "quicker on the draw" than the most practiced gangster, knew that this human devil was behind the Black Death organization. The organization dabbled in the most despicable of all criminal activities
blackmail. When its satellites wanted front page publicity they calmly arranged for the murder of an innocent victim. Van Houton's generalship was so perfect that the police refused to believe Vee Brown's allegations, so, together with his friend Condon and "the girl of the night", the detective set about unmasking the man who threatened a city.
   Vee Brown is Daly's most successful detective character. There are elements of surprise and slickness in everything he does down to the song hits which he writes when not engaged in killing gangsters. Detective story "fans" will be surprised to hear than van Houton neither makes the one customary mistake, nor is he brought to justice, but the
indomitable Brown, after incredible escapes, finds his own solution in ridding the city of an octopus-like menace and bringing peace of mind to "the girl of the night".]

Better Corpses (London: Hale, 1940; no American edition) Race Williams (& Flame)

[--Description from Vintage Library: Mary Morse, heiress to one of the oldest jewelry firms in New York, finds that her uncle has been using the business as a "front" for some highly criminal activities. Immediately after this discovery she receives blackmailing letters, threatening to expose the whole racket unless she pays up. Unable to help herself, and fearing to go to the police, she at last, in desperation, turns to Race Williams for practical assistance. Now Race Williams is a character worthy to be placed among the great ones in criminal Action. He is a gunman and a killer, but he is not a crook. He operates midway between the police and the gangster fraternity. And in this case, when he comes to Mary's aid, he finds himself up against a gang who are determined to get the better of him. Again and again he finds himself in situations from which it seems that nothing but his corpse can emerge, and each time he manages to extricate himself through his own dexterity and courage.
 Mr. Daly writes the story from the first-person view of Race Williams, a detective with a fast wit and faster gun. If ever a detective story can ever be humorous and thrilling at the same time, Daly has created it in Better Corpses.
--The Flame (Florence Drummond) - the Girl with the Criminal Mind. A woman of good - a woman of evil.]

The Legion of the Living Dead (Toronto: Popular Publications [Canada], 1947) Mr. Strang

[originally serialized in 4 parts: (4part: 15 May 1937, Detective Fiction Weekly)]

[--Description from DFW: Mr. Strang returns from the Dead]

Murder at Our House (London: Museum Press, 1950; no American edition)
Ready to Burn (London: Museum Press, 1951; no American edition) Satan Hall

[--Daly combined several of his Detective Fiction Weekly stories to make up this novel, including - 1. Satan Returns (8 September 1934); 2. Satan Laughed (15 December 1934); 3. Ready to Burn (16 February 1935).]

[set: NYC]
[--Description from Vintage Library: The police had long wanted to lay their hands on Hollis Daggett, gangster leader, who held the town in his grip. Their opportunity came when his gunmen committed a series of murders arising out of blackmail. "Satan" Hall, a brilliant detective, previously frowned upon and "retired" by authority because of his ruthlessness in bringing evil-doers to justice, is recalled to round up the gang, and the hunt is on. Conspiracy, violence and sudden death are encountered along the dark paths of the underworld, and the relentless fight to bring the criminals to justice is described in the author's most exciting manner.]

Collections of Short Stories:

The Adventures of Satan Hall: A Dime Detective Book (NY: Mysterious Press, 1988 [April]) Satan Hall

Contents [alphabetical order]:
Satan Laughed (15 December 1934, Detective Fiction Weekly)
Satan Returns (8 September 1934 Detective Fiction Weekly)
Satan Sees Red (25 June 1932, Detective Fiction Weekly)
Satan's Law (6 August 1932, Detective Fiction Weekly)

[--Introduction by Robert Weinberg. Four noveletts, over 295 pages. the very best of Daly's hard-boiled thrillers are the adventures of Satan Hall. The original series appeared in the early 1930's, during the height of of gang warfare and political corruption in the cities. And Satan Hall was Daly's avenging angel of the law--a killer as ruthless and unrelenting as any crook, and twice as deadly. The courts might forgive, but Satan Hall never did.
--Description from Abebooks: "The hard-boiled detective story began sixty-five years ago, in the June 1923 issue of Black Mask magazine. The lead story of the month was 'Knights of the Open Palm' by Carroll John Daly. The novelette was a hit with the magazine's readership - and by the late 1920s Daly was recognized as the most popular writer of pulp detective stories. The very best of Daly's several hundred thrillers are the adventures of Satan Hall. The original series appeared in the early 1930s, during the height of gang warfare and political corruption in the cities. The villains of the series were crime bosses and influence peddlers, direct from the newspaper headlines.
--The original series appeared in the early 1930s - Satan Hall was 'the man the police and gangdom alike feared'.]

The Adventures of Race Williams: A Dime Detective Book (NY: Mysterious Press, 1989 [January]) Race Williams

Contents [alphabetical order]:
City of Blood (October 1936, Dime Detective)
Corpse & Co. (February 1936, Dime Detective)
Dead Hands Reaching (November 1935, Dime Detective)
Just Another Stiff (April 1936, Dime Detective)
Some Die Hard (September 1935, Dime Detective)

[--Description from Abebooks: The Adventures of Race Williams: A Dime Detective Book (Dime Detective Pulp Classics). Series Consultant Robert Weinberg. ISBN 0892969598 Paperback. Mysterious Pr. Date: January, 1989.
--Description from Vintage Library: "I never bumped off a guy what didn't need it... you can't make hamburger without grinding up a little meat." -- Race Williams
The first Race Williams story was "Knights of the Open Palm," published in June of 1923. It marked the birth of the hard-boiled detective tale, and by the end of the 1920s Carroll John Daly was the king of the pulp detective writers - surpassing even Dashiell Hammett and Erle Stanley Gardner in popularity. And Race Williams - in the private eye business for thrills and the dough -- was the cause of it all. Though his base of operations moved from New York to Chicago to California, though he posed as newsmen, insurance investigators, gamblers, cameramen, police detectives, Williams was always a darkly heroic figure, guided by a personal moral code seldom identical with the law. Fearless, violent, brutal, Williams never hesitated to kill -- dead or alive, his prey was brought to justice. This Mysterious Press edition collects 5 Dime Detective classic stories featuring Race Williams plus an introduction by noted pulp historian Robert Weinberg.] 

Race Williams' Double Date and Other Stories (Normal, IL.: Black Dog Books, Coming in OCTOBER 2012) 9 stories

Contents:
This Corpse on Me (June 1947, Thrilling Detective [New York]) Race Williams-?*
Avenging Angel
(February 1954, Famous Detective Stories) Satan Hall
Race Williams' Double Date
(August 1948, Dime Detective) Race Williams
Murder Yet To Come
(December 1954, Famous Detective Stories)
This Corpse Is Free!
(September 1952, Smashing Detective Stories) Race Williams
Gas
(June 1953, Smashing Detective) Race Williams
Manhunter
(August 1954, Famous Detective Stories)
You'll Remember Me
(March 1946, Mammoth Detective)
I'll Feel Better When You're Dead
(December 1947, Thrilling Detective)
Appendix A
The Ambulating Lady (nonfiction)

[--Trade paperback 265 pages. Selected and with a foreword by Stephen Mertz. Introduction by Evan Lewis. Cover design by Tom Roberts.
--For two and a half decades Carroll John Daly was a driving force in crime fiction, inventing the hard-boiled school of detection. Stories of his character Race Williams are unrivaled in their headlong pace and breathtaking action. Finally, nine of the best stories by one of the most influential detective writers of all time are collected in this volume showcasing his storytelling ability at its peak.
--Race Williams' Double Date is the first major anthology of Carroll John Daly's work.
--"It's fascinating to read these compelling, powerful stories from the father of the private eye genre, written in the shadow of his successful son, Mickey Spillane." (Max Allan Collins, Edgar Award winning author of Road to Perdition).]

Article:

The Ambulating Lady (April 1947, Writers Digest) [autobiographical article]

References:

"Pulp Pioneer of the Private Eye (Carroll John Daly)" by William F. Nolan (Mike Shayne Mystery Magazine, October 1980) [interview]
"Carroll John Daly: An Appreciation/Two Interviews" by James L. Traylor (Hardboiled #4, 1986) [interview]

Единственный русский перевод:
Кэрролл Джон Дейли. Рыцари раскрытой ладони (Knights of the Open Palm [1 June 1923, Black Mask]) Race Williams-1 )

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Daly's Links:

Carroll John Daly: Hard Boiled Detective Writer on the site The Vintage Library

Race Williams & Three Gun Terry on the site thrillingdetective.com by Kevin Burton Smith

fan letter to Carroll John Daly from Mickey Spillane

My Favorite Pulps/ Satan Hall pages blog - Davy Crockett's Almanack, by Evan Lewis

 

Thanks to Bill Halvorson, Jim Doherty, Jess Nevins, Gennady Ulman & Evan Lewis for additional information !

© 2007, composed by Vladimir Matuschenko (составитель библиографии Владимир Матющенко).
 

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